Red shoes magic

I have a pair of red shoes. When I put them on I feel like Dorothy. Remember her? She was the little girl in the Wizard of Oz. When she clicked her shoes together she was magical.

Dorothy in her red shoes

Swept away by a cyclone from the Kansas prairies to the Land of Oz, Dorothy and her dog, Toto, must find their way home. Traveling to the Emerald City with a new band of friends—the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, and the Cowardly Lion—Dorothy’s fate is in the hands of a great and terrible wizard. But a wicked enemy stands in her way. For readers familiar only with the iconic 1939 film, delightful surprises are in store along Baum’s original yellow brick road. Considered “America’s first fairy tale. Dorothy accidentally splashed the wicked witch with a bucket of water, causing her to melt away. At the end, it is revealed that Dorothy can return home by simply closing her eyes, clicking the heels of the slippers together three times and repeating the phrase, “There’s no place like home.”

 Waltz away!

My red shoes are magical too, I dance in them.

 Gail’s red shoes

 Dance in the 15th century

The best part of these is the all-over bling. Can’t miss the dancing feet. Not only do they make me dance, they are so comfortable and match my blingy dress. They are for rhythm dances. You know, cha-cha, rumba, samba, salsa, mambo, bachata.

A little bitty about red shoes: Red shoes — if not always red soles — has long been associated with issues of power and identity. During the reign of Louis XIV, only aristocratic men had the right to wear shoes with red heels — they were strictly reserved for the court. Thus the color neatly distinguished between the haves and have-nots. 

 ballroom dancing-red dress

About gailingis

Gail Ingis a tough blonde from Brooklyn, writes history and romance. Gail’s early days began and ended with writing, drawing and music. After graduating from the New York School of Interior Design with a BFA in Interior Architecture and Design and Master’s studies in Architecture and Design Criticism at The New School (Parsons), she worked in interior design and architecture, and founded a school of Interior Design. She resides in Connecticut with her scientist-writer husband. Currently, she sits on Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum Board of Trustees, and serves as the curator of art exhibitions. Prior to her debut as an author, she illustrated a book for Deborah Galiley, "Seeking Paradise" that can be found on Amazon. Also a professional artist, her varied paintings are an extension of her illustration work in design. Gail spent long days and nights dallying in Coney Island, the inspiration for her project of beach and boardwalk scenes. She is a member of the Connecticut Chapter of Romance Writer’s of America and a member of American Society of Interior Designers.
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